Monday, September 2, 2019

Cash In Stock Market Profits, Buy Gold & Silver And Wait It Out

  
The economy and markets can’t go on like they have been for the last ten years. Marc explains what’s coming…

Marc Faber of The Gloom Boom Doom Report interviewed by Half Dollar of Silver Doctors.

Marc Faber returns to Silver Doctors for a hard hitting interview you surely won’t want to miss.


- Source, Silver Doctors

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Marc Faber: The Unfolding Pension Crisis


My guest in this interview is Dr Marc Faber. Dr. Faber is the editor of the Gloom, Boom & Doom Report. 

He is referred to as the Billionaire they call Dr. Doom in Tony Robbins book, Money Master The Game. 

In this episode, we will look at what the global economy and markets are telling us and the brewing global pension crisis.

- Video Source

Friday, August 23, 2019

Marc Faber: Outlook for emerging markets moving forward


Marc Faber, editor and publisher of The Gloom, Boom & Doom Report speaks to Nikunj Dalmia about the prospects of a rescission, outlook for emerging markets and how to spot the next booming asset.

- Source, ET

Monday, August 19, 2019

Marc Faber: Financial Turmoil Ahead, Gold is My Largest Single Holding


Marc discusses how various modern economic theories are already being tested as the world now has 15 trillion in negative-yielding bonds. He feels that Modern Monetary Theory would result in an overall loss of freedoms as people would become increasingly dependent on government. 

Gold is again rising but how high it will go, Marc, does not know but to him, it seems inexpensive when compared to negatively yielding bonds. Gold should stay above 1400 and investors should hold it as insurance in varying amounts depending on their confidence in the financial system.

- Source, Palisade Radio

Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Marc Faber on Higher Education & Protecting Yourself in an Economic Collapse


Marc Faber is an economic authority on global macroeconomics, capital markets, and investment and the Editor & Publisher of "The Gloom Boom & Doom Report". 

He spoke with The Prospect Group about university style formal education, the coming economic collapse, and the options people to preserve their wealth.

Saturday, July 27, 2019

The Billionaire They Call Dr. Doom


My guest in this interview is Dr Marc Faber. Dr. Faber was born in Zurich, Switzerland. He went to school in Geneva and Zurich and finished high school with the Matura. 

He studied Economics at the University of Zurich and, at the age of 24, obtained a PhD in Economics magna cum laude. Between 1970 and 1978, Dr Faber worked for White Weld & Company Limited in New York, Zurich and Hong Kong. Since 1973, he has lived in Hong Kong. From 1978 to February 1990, he was the Managing Director of Drexel Burnham Lambert (HK) Ltd. 

In June 1990, he set up his own business, MARC FABER LIMITED which acts as an investment advisor and fund manager.

Monday, July 22, 2019

Marc Faber Discusses What’s Going on in Our Economy and Markets


Jason Hartman talks with Marc Faber, editor at Gloom, Boom, Doom, about what’s going on in our economy with the massive asset inflation that’s hit in the past few years. 

The two examine what central banks will have to do in order to deal with the looming shortages and what investments can buck that trend when it arises.

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Marc Faber: Global Economy is on the Cusp of a Recession


  • According to Dr. Faber, the global economy is on the cusp of a recession. Investors are advised to batten down the hatches.
  • A global / domestic economic maelstrom of epic proportions where paper assets denominated in the reserve currency lose up to 80% is possible.
  • Few asset classes will endure the economic storm ahead, however, safe havens include gold, silver, PMs shares and cryptocurrencies.
  • Despite the remarkable increases in modern productivity given quantum leaps in access to technology and information, living standards are sagging.
  • Incomes have not matched increases in the cost of living.
  • The duo concur that the erosion of the standard of living is directly correlated to profligate money expansion, which acts as a reverse “Invisible Hand.”
  • Both the guest/host advocate diversification of asset classes, increasing the weighting of safe haven, hard money assets in the coming years to shield wealth from potential economic volatility.
- Source, Gold Seek Radio

Monday, July 8, 2019

Politicians Like to Blame Everyone Else For the Problems They Created

Referring to China, Kyle Bass claimed at a recent investment conference that, “Right now, there is no trust and no rule of law. The Chinese government lies, cheats, and steals as a national ideology.”

I heard that the audience rewarded his candid statements with applause.

Blaming the Chinese for everything appeals to the Democrats and the Republicans alike, and that is what counts for President Trump ahead of the 2020 elections. In fact, I find the applause following Bass' accusations deeply disturbing given the relatively high social standing and knowledge of the conference attendees. It also reminds me of so many other occasions in history when leaders blamed other people (usually minority groups and foreigners, or whosoever is convenient at the time) for their own shortcomings and failures.

Not long ago, Elaine Chao (the current US Secretary of Transportation) opined that, "Smoot and Hawley ginned up the Tariff Act of 1930 to get America back to work after the Stock Market Crash of ’29. Instead, it destroyed trade so effectively that by 1932, American exports to Europe were just a third of what they had been in 1929. World trade fell two-thirds as other nations retaliated. Jobs evaporated."

I think it is fair to say that the Smoot–Hawley Tariff did not cause the depression (there were numerous other factors at play), but it certainly accelerated the downturn and prolonged the global economic slump as global trade collapsed. Currently, the global economy (including the US) is already weakening badly (many sectors are already in recession) and the trade war will aggravate the economic downturn. US economic weakness is indicated by strengthening US Treasuries. It is also confirmed by the decline in oil and lumber prices. Furthermore, the US Markit manufacturing PMI just dropped by 2 points to a near-recession 50.6 level.

In general, I believe that Wall Street strategists and economists grossly underestimate the downside risk of equities. I concede that the US stock market is becoming near-term oversold and, therefore, could rebound in June and July (traditional summer rally). The US stock market is, however, far from oversold from a longer-term perspective. My advice: Sell the rallies and reduce equity positions.

Finally, remember regarding the constant China bashing that, as Daniel Kahneman observed, “A reliable way to make people believe in falsehoods is frequent repetition, because familiarity is not easily distinguished from truth. Authoritarian institutions and marketers have always known this fact.”

- Source, Marc Faber

Thursday, July 4, 2019

Marc Faber: Massive Asset Inflation, Central Banks Confusion


Jason Hartman talks with Marc Faber, editor at Gloom, Boom & Doom Report, about what's going on in our economy with the massive asset inflation that's hit in the past few years. The two examine what central banks will have to do in order to deal with the looming shortages and what investments can buck that trend when it arises.

Saturday, June 29, 2019

Marc Faber on US China Trade War, the Japan Trap


With global markets struggling for direction after a rocky start to the year, Dr Doom has been conspicuously absent from the conversation. Investment adviser Marc Faber, 72, who adopted the nickname in 1987 after a newspaper column highlighted his contrarian outlook on markets, has had a quiet six months.

Faber – a once regular guest on business news shows such as CNBC’s Squawk Box and Bloomberg Television – has faded from view since the publication of his October newsletter The Gloom, Boom & Doom Report for comments that were condemned as racist. This included a passage where Faber used offensive racial references in laying out a bleak picture for the US if its early immigration flows had been from Africa rather than Europe. He has since been dropped from the booking lists for programmes at Fox News and CNBC, according to Reuters.

At the time, Faber told Canada’s Global & Mail he stood by the remarks, saying in an email exchange that he did not regret writing the passage and that he had a free right to express his views.

When This Week in Asia spoke to Faber at his suite at the Grand Hyatt in Hong Kong this year, he sounded resigned to the loss of his appearances on business television.

“Everything in life and the universe has a timeline, it is transient. In other words, what you have today, you may not have tomorrow,” Faber said.

Known for a keen interest in history, and the works of innovators such as Russian “wave theory” economist Nikolai Kondratiev, Faber has slipped from the public spotlight just as global markets have entered a period of heightened volatility.

Faber was widely considered media gold at times of crisis for his tendency to speak candidly, tapping a pragmatism that seems tied to his upbringing in Zurich.

Faber also has a solid record in calling the market correctly. Among Barron’s Roundtable members in 2002 to 2011, he scored the second highest annualised return of 23.4 per cent among the eight annual stock-pickers, according to Pundit Tracker.

In February, the current market turmoil had not set in, yet Faber foresaw what was to become a major turning point for the markets, spelling out a gloomy forecast just days before the Dow Jones Industrials would record its largest single-day point decline.

“I don’t think markets will be very attractive this year and I want to own some cash,” Faber said at the time.

On May 1 he wrote in a monthly commentary that January’s high of 2,872 for the S&P 500 was a “major top”.

He advised investors to consider US government bonds, even as he cautioned in the long term that the US dollar was a “doomed currency”.

“My view is that a cash portfolio is safer with Treasuries than with banks,” Faber said.

In April, Faber told This Week in Asia he still favoured US Treasuries at the current yield on the 10-year near 2.9 per cent.

“The whole investment community, with a few exceptions, is negative on Treasuries. I have a different view,” Faber said. He holds about 30 per cent of his own investible assets in US government debt...